Mayo Clinic fires unvaccinated employees amid labor shortage

As of late October, there were about 8,000 unvaccinated Mayo Clinic employees.

Protesters gather in Peace Plaza in downtown Rochester in October in opposition to Mayo Clinic's vaccine mandate. (Courtesy photos provided to Alpha News)

The world famous Mayo Clinic, headquartered in Minnesota, fired its unvaccinated employees on Monday.

This decision comes as the latest data appear to show that the COVID-19 vaccine doesn’t stop its recipients from contracting or transmitting the virus. In many countries, vaccinated people even seem to suffer a higher per-capita infection rate than their unvaccinated peers.

Mayo’s decision is so unpopular that even the mainstream media are reporting sympathetically on the workers who were fired. A local ABC affiliate began its report on the mass firing by introducing readers to Kathy Kerssen, a 19-year clinic veteran who was dismissed this week after not submitting to the jab.

Minnesota’s health care industry is already dealing with a “record-high” number of job vacancies. ABC 6 highlights a question about this problem posed by Minnesota Rep. Peggy Bennett: “If everyone can catch it and everyone can spread it why are we firing these people that we need?”

“They’re going to find they’ve lost their most dedicated, their most loyal, their finest employees they have,” former gubernatorial candidate Mike Marti predicted on a livestream hosted by current candidate Dr. Neil Shah.

“They were already short-staffed. They were already having lots of trouble keeping shifts fully functional. Now they’ve lost a lot of good-quality employees,” he said. One of these employees was his wife.

“My wife is a 20-year employee of the clinic, she’s an RN at the clinic,” he began, before correcting that she “was [employed] until today, anyhow. She no longer is employed there.”

“The clinic has been a bright, shining beacon in this area for decades. Unfortunately, they’ve lost a lot of that shine today,” he concluded, accusing Mayo of disregarding the science in favor of keeping up with the latest progressive politics. “It’s all PR to them.”

Shah also wondered how much Mayo Clinic is actually following the science. “They view this mandate as reducing the risk to their patients. That’s kind of an odd thing given that the vaccines are so leaky,” he said.

“We’ve known for quite some time that the effectiveness of the vaccine drops off precipitously … The majority of infections now are in the vaxxed and boosted population and in some countries there appears to be negative vaccine efficacy,” he continued, referencing nations like Denmark and the U.K.

The most current data, he said, is “clearly a signal that the vaccines do not … reduce the risk of passing infection.”

Despite calls from several legislators and a small protest held in Rochester, the clinic’s home, there is no indication Mayo will look back after firing an unknown number of its workers. As of late October, there were about 8,000 unvaccinated Mayo Clinic employees.