Minneapolis residents plan ‘pilgrimage’ to George Floyd Square 

The intersection, officially recognized as “George Perry Floyd Square” by the city of Minneapolis last year, is revered by left-wing activists as a “sacred space."

George Floyd Square is the name given to 38th Street and Chicago Avenue, the intersection where Floyd died in May 2020. (Fibonacci Blue/Flickr)

Two Minneapolis neighborhood organizations are inviting residents to participate in a “pilgrimage to George Floyd Square” along with a visit to the nearby “Say Their Names” cemetery.

George Floyd Square is the name given to 38th Street and Chicago Avenue, the intersection where Floyd died in May 2020. The intersection, officially recognized as “George Perry Floyd Square” by the city of Minneapolis last year, is revered by left-wing activists as a “sacred space” where baptisms and even “miracles” have taken place.

The city agreed to pay two artists last year to build nine “temporary shrines” along Lake Street to “victims of state violence,” one for each minute “that George Floyd suffered before he died.”

Even religious institutions have gone along with this sanctification of Floyd, including the Catholic University of America, which displayed a painting depicting Floyd as Jesus Christ.

Now, the Linden Hills Neighborhood Council and the Fulton Neighborhood Association are funding a May 11 “pilgrimage” to George Floyd Square, which will be led by “guides” from the George Floyd Global Memorial.

“As we approach the third anniversary of the murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis Police, we will reflect on the racial reckoning of 2020 and our collective and ongoing pursuit of racial justice in Minnesota. George Floyd Square includes murals, offerings, a meeting space, a greenhouse, and more,” an event description says.

The George Floyd Global Memorial appears to regularly provide guides for pilgrimages to the site of its namesake’s death.

“Pilgrimage journeys at George Floyd Square (GFS) provide guided experiences for visitors to posture themselves in a sacred space to grieve, pay respect, and be inspired to pursue racial justice,” the group says on its website.

It offers visitors “same-day pilgrimages” or “custom pilgrimages” for larger groups, which take into “consideration the schedules, intentions, and vocations of the pilgrims.”

One of the seven “pilgrimage guides” is a woman named Vine Adams who openly identifies as a black nationalist.

Near George Floyd Square is a “Say Their Names” cemetery, which features 100 gravestones with the names of people who have been killed by law enforcement.

“During pilgrimage journeys, community members take on the role of pilgrimage guides,” says the George Floyd Global Memorial. “They tell their own experiences and the stories behind the offerings within GFS, developing pilgrims’ understanding of the significance of GFS and the ongoing fight for racial justice.”

 

Anthony Gockowski
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Anthony Gockowski is Editor-in-Chief of Alpha News. He previously worked as an editor for The Minnesota Sun and Campus Reform, and wrote for the Daily Caller.