Fr. Altman: Bishops silence truth-tellers but not abusive priests

Altman has been censured by his bishop while, in his same diocese, a priest who used a gay hook-up app goes unpunished.

Fr. James Altman/Rebecca Brannon

There’s a clear “double standard” in how U.S. bishops handle priests who unapologetically defend the truths of the Catholic faith versus how they deal with those who engage in deviant lifestyles.

That was the argument put forth during an hour-long podcast hosted by Dr. Taylor Marshall late last month featuring Fr. James Altman.

Marshall is a popular traditional Catholic commentator and author of the book “Infiltration,” which outlines the many ways in which the Catholic Church has been corrupted over the past several centuries.

Marshall told Altman that it’s obvious the hierarchy comes down harder on outspoken and orthodox priests like himself than they do on priests like Msgr. Jeffrey Burrill.

Burrill is a priest still in good standing with the Diocese of La Crosse, the same diocese as Altman. He resigned as the general secretary of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops last month after it was discovered he used a phone app called Grindr that’s popular among active homosexuals.

Burrill’s bishop, William Callahan, has thus far not removed him from public ministry, unlike Altman.

Altman agreed with Marshall’s sentiments, stating that, “Fr. James Martin and the National Catholic Reporter … immediately leaped to [Msgr. Burrill’s] defense. [Yet] they rip on me.”

Altman also pointed out to Marshall how liberal prelates like former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick laid the groundwork for the sort of double standard that’s evident in the Church today. To this, Marshall said he believes many clergy in Rome are rushing to throw out their phones because they too have used the Grindr app as well.

Altman further told Marshall that Pope Francis’ motu proprio “Traditionis Custodes” is highly inappropriate.

“Vatican II never abrogated [the Traditional Latin Mass], nor could Vatican II abrogate it,” Altman explained.

“The bishop of Rome has … taken it upon himself … to restrict something to which we, the faithful, are entitled by our baptism to celebrate.”

“He has no right to do that,” Altman said.