Kaufman: Due process, double standards and ‘believing all women’

Only in today’s Democratic Party can a white heterosexual man botch a pandemic, be alleged a sexual harasser, still remain popular, and be a potential cabinet appointee in a new presidential administration. 


On Sunday, Lindsay Boylan accused Andrew Cuomo of sexual harassment, claiming the New York governor discussed her physical appearance when she worked for him as a deputy secretary of economic development and special adviser from 2015-18.

She said Cuomo sexually harassed her over a period of years, adding “I *know* I am not the only woman.” No one else, however, has come forward with public allegations.

Boylan offers no evidence or additional details. She’s declined several requests for comments, stating, “I have no interest in talking to journalists. I am about validating the experience of countless women and making sure abuse stops.”

During her time in Cuomo’s office, Boylan herself was accused of harassing behavior that resulted in her resignation, according to internal personnel records. Three black female staffers claimed Boylan “treated them like children.”

Since her departure, Boylan was crushed in a primary election this summer against U.S. Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY), barely netting 20% of the vote.

Boylan also is now a Cuomo critic, recently calling into question his support for working parents. She described her experience working for the governor as “beyond toxic.”

The 36-year-old left-winger is currently running for Manhattan Borough president.

The allegations come as President-elect Joe Biden is reportedly considering Cuomo for attorney general.

Only in today’s Democratic Party can a white heterosexual man botch a pandemic, be alleged a sexual harasser, still remain popular, and be a potential cabinet appointee in a new presidential administration.

As for “believing all women” or a presumption of innocence? It’s an easy decision for me, based on due process.

But ask Tara Reade. When she accused Biden of sexual harassment, Reade was more vivid than most, yet only Megyn Kelly, who’s now an unaffiliated journalist, interviewed her at length.

CNN? They mocked her claims.

Sen. Kamala Harris? Confused and hypocritical, as usual. The VP-elect usually is no fan of due process.

“Champion of women” Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand? No interest.

Sen. Mazie “shut up men” Hirono? Laughably and tellingly AWOL.

Those female Democrat senators clearly “believe women” only when they accuse conservatives of misconduct.

The major news networks apparently agree.

Like any sane person, I do not “believe all women” from the start, no matter their political leanings. Do we “believe all men”? There are female liars and male liars. And while I always listen seriously, certain claims should be met with skepticism.

Christine Ford and others two years ago were less credible than Reade, and yet for months received national fawning. As she planned to run for president, the deceitful Harris raised money off these smears.

As the New York Post Editorial Board opined yesterday about such double standards:

“The left often embraces the idea that ‘believing the victim’ means skipping things like evidence and context — and what the accused has to say. This has been the default on college campuses for years and was the standard they tried to impose at the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation hearings.”

Cuomo, busy on Monday boasting of a vaccine he and his media acolytes long doubted, denied the claims, so that will likely be the end.

Had there been similar allegations against, say, Nebraska Republican Gov. Pete Ricketts, it would be big news for several days among the usual assortment of corporate media suspects. Somewhat similar accusations and persistent reporting in 2018 against Republican Eric Greitens ran the now-former Missouri governor out of office.

Is this how our system works? For Democrats in power, the answer is increasingly yes.