Regulators request records for patients prescribed ivermectin by Dr. Jensen

Ivermectin is a Nobel Prize-winning antiparasitic drug that has been widely consumed in a relatively unrestricted way with very few negative side effects for nearly half a century.

Dr. Scott Jensen presides over the Minnesota Senate. (Minnesota Senate Media/Facebook)

Dr. Scott Jensen has been asked to turn over the medical records of patients for whom he has prescribed ivermectin.

Jensen is a medical doctor from Chaska who served in the Minnesota Senate from 2017 to 2021 and is now running for governor. He was propelled to national fame last year for his skepticism of Minnesota’s coronavirus response and remains in the spotlight because of his hesitancy about forcing COVID vaccines on people who may not be at risk of dying from the virus. Now, he’s apparently under the state’s regulatory microscope as the Minnesota Board of Medical Practice has asked to see some of his patients’ records.

This is not the first time Jensen has been examined by the board. Rather, his medical license has been investigated at least four other times as detractors make complaints about him. Each investigation has found no wrongdoing, but during one of the investigations he revealed that he has prescribed ivermectin, a fact which has become the center of the latest investigation.

“In your response, you indicated that you’ve prescribed ivermectin to some of your patients for treatment of COVID-19,” the board wrote to Jensen in a letter that he read on camera in a video posted to Facebook. “Pursuant to the board’s investigation of this matter, please provide the following records … copies of medical records for the most recent three to five patients to whom you’ve prescribed ivermectin to treat COVID-19,” the board demanded.

The board specified that Jensen will face punishment if he fails to comply.

Ivermectin is a Nobel Prize-winning antiparasitic drug that has been widely consumed in a relatively unrestricted way with very few negative side effects for nearly half a century. Since 2020, researchers have noted its potential efficacy in treating COVID-19 patients.

Doctors prescribing ivermectin in an attempt to remedy COVID infections are said to be doing so “off-label,” a term used to describe when a drug is used for something other than its FDA-approved purpose. While this might sound unorthodox, about 1 in 5 prescriptions written in the U.S. are off-label.

Jensen is apparently confused as to why the board is investigating the use of ivermectin in his practice, given the commonality of off-label prescriptions and relative safety of the drug.

“Why do they want your records?” he asks in his recent video before issuing a warning about government overreach into private citizens’ lives: “If it can happen to me it can happen to you. Friends, this is happening to you. This really isn’t about me.”

Finally, he notes that many of the alleged complaints against him cited in the board’s investigations appear to come directly from social media. “Virtually every one of the complaints from the October 21 letter [were] almost word for word verbiage from tweets,” he observes.