House GOP leader blasts Dems for sympathizing with criminals over victims

Daudt also said that Democrats are trying to "increase spending $21 for every $1 of tax relief."

House Minority Leader Kurt Daudt speaks on the House floor. (Minnesota House Public Information Services/Facebook)

Minnesota House Minority Leader Kurt Daudt joined Liz Collin Reports last week where he blasted Democrats for “wanting to believe criminals” and raise taxes.

Specifically, he criticized his opponents across the aisle for seeking to fund alternatives to traditional police and holding tax breaks hostage while pursuing permanent spending increases.

“Democrats are wanting to invest in things that are not law-enforcement related,” Daudt told Collin. “They want alternatives to law enforcement that are unproven, untested,” he said, alluding to community policing groups that call themselves things like “peace activists” and “violence interrupters.”

He added that many of these options “lack oversight and structure,” arguing they are more enabling of bad behavior than traditional police departments.

“The biggest problem in the city of Minneapolis is that we’re down 300+ police officers. That could take a decade to refill those positions,” he concluded.

Daudt said Democrats in St. Paul are “always wanting to believe criminals and be sympathetic to criminals instead of actually listening to and being sympathetic to … victims.” He suggested that this lack of sympathy for victims is one reason why authorities have failed to end the fentanyl crisis.

Finally, he blasted Democrats for not supporting tax and spending cuts, even in the face of a historic surplus. Minnesota has over $10 billion in the bank. Daudt said this is because the state’s tax policies extract significantly more from the citizenry than the government knows how to spend. Despite this, he reported that his left-wing House colleagues will not support tax cuts unless Republicans agree to permanent spending increases.

“We already have a fully-funded state budget that we passed last year. I don’t see a need to broadly increase state spending,” he said. “We have to do the tax relief.”

After adding up the numbers, Daudt said Democrats are trying to “increase spending $21 for every $1 dollar of tax relief.”

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